Author: bajrasanjeev

The Education-to-Work Transition of Young Rural-Urban Migrants in Kathmandu, Nepal

This article examines the experiences of youth transitioning from education to work, within the specific context of rural–urban migration in Nepal. This context is chosen as, compared to developed countries, experiences in developing ones have remained under-researched in the transition studies literature. The study is informed by a biographical research approach, using qualitative longitudinal life (hi)story methods, with a view to revealing local transition patterns and the life events influencing these. The study identifies four different patterns reflecting the education-to-work transitions of young rural–urban migrants in Nepal. These patterns encompass different pathways involving education, migration, work, and mandatory waiting periods. Read More

Baseline Survey for Girls Advocacy Alliance Report

At Ecorys we aim to deliver real benefit to society through the work we do. We offer research, consultancy and project management, specialising in economic, social and spatial development. Focusing on complex market, policy and management issues we provide our clients in the public, private and not-for-profit sectors worldwide with a unique perspective and high-value solutions.Ecorys’ remarkable history spans more than 85 years. Our expertise covers economy and competitiveness; regions, cities and real estate; energy and water; transport and mobility; social policy, education, health and governance. We value our independence, integrity and partnerships.Our staff comprises dedicated experts from academia and Read More

Reviewing the child labour debates through Kamlahari system in Nepal

The Kamaiya (debt-bondage) system affecting a section of the Tharu ethnic group in Nepal was outlawed in 2000 but it has found its way as Kamalahari, Kamaiya child bonded labour. This Kamalahari (Kamaiya child bonded labour) system in Nepal has been labelled as modern forms ofslavery by international and national human rights organizations and policy makers. This study presents two perspectives on children at work. The first perspective theorizes children at work as child labour. It uses Gillian’s (2003) supply-push, demand/pull and meso/micro/macro factors to explorethe various determinants that are supporting the continuation of child labour. Like in the case Read More